FreshVoice’s Great Content Map: Part 1

Mourn ye not the loss of those nasty, useless websites from the 1990s. We’ve moved past those early, unsophisticated days of Al Gore’s invention and today the Internet is an ecosphere teeming with intelligent design. Content that appears carelessly has a hard time competing against its highly-realized and sophisticated brethren; this is Darwinism at a literary level.

If you’re going to shout above that din, you can’t be merely a Wielder of Words, a Purveyor of Progress or a Thinker of Thoughts. You need to be a Crafter of Content!

What can we learn about capturing an audience’s hearts and minds by considering not just what words and sentences to use in which order, but how and where they appear on a page, and what appears around them?

When you get down to the bones of a great piece of contemporary content, everything is carefully sculpted and delicately connected. This is what I call the Content Map. It’s the architecture overlaying the actual words, like signposts on a journey, or finding clues on a treasure hunt. The Content Map provides direction and motivates the reader to continue.  Continue reading

So many book ideas…how to pick just one?

When first time non-fiction book authors come to me, I find that just as often as not they suffer from too many ideas as opposed to no ideas, or only one. After years of  helping them wrangle through the process of selecting which of their ideas they should focus on for their first book, I came up with a way to look at multiple ideas and quantify their readiness.  It’s now  part of the first course I offer online in the Academy, Passion & Purpose.

It’s called the Book Idea Quiz, and It gives you a method for determining which idea will work best for you and the market, right now.  You answer the following six questions, assigning point values to each, and the tool works out which is the winning idea, and what you might need to do to make a so-so idea a winning one, if that’s the one you’re set on doing first.

Here are the factors I use in the Quiz…use it to get you thinking… Continue reading

6 Ways to Gloss Over Your Fear of Public Speaking

Public speaking IS totally terrifying.

Public speaking can be terrifying.

If you suffer from Glossophobia, there’s a chance you’d rather die than speak in public. The good news is, there are lots of ways to get around this common fear. There’s no need to listen to that nasty voice in your head screaming They’re all going to laugh at you! because no one actually wants to laugh at you. And overall, being a solid speaker and delivering a quality presentation is completely within your hands. One day, Grasshopper, you will be a top contender in the World Championships of Public Speaking! (Yes. That’s a thing. Some people actually love public speaking – and the key to their success is practice!)

These 6 steps will put you on the path to success. Continue reading

Have you heard? Changes to CIP data for indie authors & publishers!

Attention Canadian indie publishers/authors!

For years while publishing in Canada I had submitted data to Library & Archives Canada (LAC) to create the CIP (Cataloguing in Publication) data for the copyright page of author’s works. I’m sure those of you like me have been doing the same.

However, some folks may not yet know that a nearly a year ago, LAC made a significant change to their program, and no longer will be providing cataloguing data from independent authors’ titles.

I wanted to dig in a bit deeper to find out why this occurred, and what would be the data repercussions for indie authors. To do so, I spoke with several LAC’s specialists from both the CIP team and the Legal Deposit team, and here are their responses:

What is the rationale for this decision?

CIP Team:  When the CIP program started, self-publishing did not exist. The program always was intended for publishing houses with a large inventory of titles with large print run.  With the larger number of self-publishers finding about the CIP program, Library and Archives Canada provided pre-publishing record when requested, disregarding the basic reason for CIP.  Our CIP team can no longer provide that service to self-publishers, so the initial policy has been reinforced.

When did this come into effect?

The reinforced legislation was applied at the start of our new fiscal year,  April 1, 2017.

How then do indie publishers and authors ensure their works are listed in the national archives?

Legal Deposit Team: A CIP record is actually not required for this. Books are catalogued when they are received through normal channels, i.e. Legal Deposit. This has always been the way for publishers to submit their publications. If they were received at CIP, they would simply forward the publications to us at Legal Deposit in order to be processed properly. Legal deposit applies to all publishers in Canada.

Under the terms of the Library and Archives of Canada Act 2004, Canadian publishers are required to deposit copies of their published material with us.


So, the short response is that you do not need to have CIP data on your copyright page in order for your title to be legally on file in Canada’s national archives, and you will not be able to do this anymore. Instead, you simply register your title only with the Legal Deposit division.

Of course, you can still obtain free ISBNs for your titles through Library & Archives Canada, and can set that up HERE.

To learn more about the Legal Deposit process, go HERE. Basically, you need to fill out a form and mail them two copies of each format of the book (hard cover, soft cover, etc.) that you publish.